Never stops being hilarious.



phoenixings:

Firefly  1x01 Serenity

B: I’ve been out of the abbey two days, I’ve beaten a lawman senseless, I’ve fallen in with criminals. I watched the captain shoot the man I swore to protect. And I’m not even sure if I think he was wrong. I believe… I just… I think I’m on the wrong ship.
I: Maybe. Or maybe you’re exactly where you ought to be.

Reblogged from whatistrueforme ★ Originally from pumpkinings


vmagazine:

Every spring, the entire county of Luoping will transform into a brilliant golden sea of flowers.

The small county of Luoping lies in the relatively underdeveloped eastern part of the Yunnan province, neighboring Guizhou and Guangxi provinces. It sits 137 miles (220 km) east of the capital Kunming,China.

In Luoping, the local plains in the Yunnan-Guizhou Plateau, is home to around 32,865 acres (133 million sq m) of canola flowers every spring.  Spring is also honey season, the blooming canola (rapeseed) flowers attract bees and the area has become a national base for raising bees and processing honey. A few miles to the north of Luoping is NiuJie, here the flowers are grown in circular rings following the contours of the slopes similar to rice terraces.

The 9 Dragon Waterfall (Jiulong Waterfalls) is nearby, boasting a group of majestic waterfalls, the tallest which is nearly 184 feet (56m) high and 360 feet (110m) wide.  Along the southeast portion of Luoping runs the Duoyi River which is formed by the water from five underground springs, the 7-½ mile (12km) river is surrounded by bamboo.

Best time of the year to visit is mid-February to early April.

The best view is atop Jinjifeng / Jinjiling (Golden Rooster Hill); many photographers set up on the top to shoot the sunrise and sunset over the sea of flowers.

Luoping in Yunnan Province, Wuyuan in Jiangxi Province and Anshun in Guizhou Province are all popular destinations for flower fans.

photos: ©Rachel Yin / ©Anne Berlin /YNA/ACT all rights reserved

Reblogged from stillbeatsurname ★ Originally from vmagazine


Reblogged from purplishnebula ★ Originally from mishasteaparty


tastefullyoffensive:

…I accept nothing! [via]

tastefullyoffensive:

…I accept nothing!

[via]

Reblogged from neuroneptune ★ Originally from tastefullyoffensive


Reblogged from neuroneptune ★ Originally from heyfunniest


Reblogged from neuroneptune ★ Originally from kushandwizdom


Reblogged from katsudonburi ★ Originally from mykingdomforapen


oimatchstickman:

wobbufetts:

aidn:

how the hell do i talk to people

Stand in front of them and press A

image

Reblogged from neuroneptune ★ Originally from aidn


Reblogged from thejunglenook ★ Originally from sizvideos


Firefly Rewatch: 1.01 (Serenity) - Are you always this sentimental?

Reblogged from neuroneptune ★ Originally from daenystormborn


Reblogged from hilaroux ★ Originally from mstrkrftz


benjoyment:

This is simply a followup to my previous post, showing what a difference just 10 minutes can make.

benjoyment:

This is simply a followup to my previous post, showing what a difference just 10 minutes can make.

Reblogged from kendraannicolemu ★ Originally from benjoyment


spaceplasma:

Jupiter’s Irregular Satellites

The planet Jupiter has 67 confirmed moons. This gives it the largest retinue of moons with “reasonably secure” orbits of any planet in the Solar System. In fact, Jupiter and its moons are like a miniature solar system with the inner moons orbiting faster than the others. Eight of Jupiter’s moons are regular satellites, with prograde and nearly circular orbits that are not greatly inclined with respect to Jupiter’s equatorial plane. The remainder of Jupiter’s moons are irregular satellites, whose prograde and retrograde orbits are much farther from Jupiter and have high inclinations and eccentricities. These moons were probably captured by Jupiter from solar orbits. There are 17 recently discovered irregular satellites that have not yet been named.

Image Credit: NASA/ESA/Lowell Observatory/J. Spencer/JHU-APL

spaceplasma:

Jupiter’s Irregular Satellites

The planet Jupiter has 67 confirmed moons. This gives it the largest retinue of moons with “reasonably secure” orbits of any planet in the Solar System. In fact, Jupiter and its moons are like a miniature solar system with the inner moons orbiting faster than the others. Eight of Jupiter’s moons are regular satellites, with prograde and nearly circular orbits that are not greatly inclined with respect to Jupiter’s equatorial plane. The remainder of Jupiter’s moons are irregular satellites, whose prograde and retrograde orbits are much farther from Jupiter and have high inclinations and eccentricities. These moons were probably captured by Jupiter from solar orbits. There are 17 recently discovered irregular satellites that have not yet been named.

Image Credit: NASA/ESA/Lowell Observatory/J. Spencer/JHU-APL

Reblogged from schrodingersmeower ★ Originally from spaceplasma


tasmaniabehindthescenery:

Mount Pleasant Radio Telescope Observatory
The University of Tasmania’s Mount Pleasant Radio Telescope Observatory under a brilliant night sky, thanks to @miaglastonbury. 
Grote Reber, an American pioneer of radio astronomy in the 1930s, made Tasmania his home in the 1950s because of its unique location at high magnetic latitude. He settled on the outskirts of Bothwell, a rural town 1 hour north-west of Hobart, and spent the next forty years working in partnership with the university and undertaking world-leading work in radio astronomy. 
Go Behind The Scenery here.
Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by Mia Glastonbury. 

tasmaniabehindthescenery:

Mount Pleasant Radio Telescope Observatory

The University of Tasmania’s Mount Pleasant Radio Telescope Observatory under a brilliant night sky, thanks to @miaglastonbury.

Grote Reber, an American pioneer of radio astronomy in the 1930s, made Tasmania his home in the 1950s because of its unique location at high magnetic latitude. He settled on the outskirts of Bothwell, a rural town 1 hour north-west of Hobart, and spent the next forty years working in partnership with the university and undertaking world-leading work in radio astronomy. 

Go Behind The Scenery here.

Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by Mia Glastonbury

Reblogged from schrodingersmeower ★ Originally from tasmaniabehindthescenery