@everickert So basically, how many supernovae contributed the elements which are right now inside you? Or me? Or any of us?

I’ve left this idea to smoulder in the back of my mind for about 24 hours now (sorry for the delay), and unfortunately, I can only conclude that there’s no possible way of knowing. Which is a pity, because it’s a very interesting question.

The minimum is one. Stars which are massive enough to explode as supernovae are the Universe’s only real way of creating iron in any significant quantity. Our blood contains a lot of iron (as does our planet), so at least one supernova must have contributed.

The maximum? Well… I can estimate it. But only with some wild speculation, some horrifically inaccurate estimates, and some completely uncertain assumptions. So…

The first stars in the Universe formed during the epoch of reionisation, around 150 million to one billion years after the Big Bang. Those first stars are quite mysterious. We know nothing about them. They would have been made entirely from Hydrogen, Helium, and a pinch of Lithium. They must have been very massive, and would have burned out very quickly and produced the first supernovae ever. None remain in the Universe today, and none have ever been identified by astronomers. As such, we know nothing about how many there were. That part is impossible to even guess at. This was, after all, before the galaxies had even formed.

In the remaining 13.65 billion years, a lot of supernovae must have exploded. In our galaxy today, they explode at a rate of about 20000 every million years. Assuming that this has never varied, that gives a total of 2730000000 supernovae in our galaxy since reionisation. 2.73 billion supernovae is actually a gross underestimate. Various cosmic events would have caused bursts of star formation and subsequent flurries of supernovae. Events such as our galaxy devouring smaller galaxies, or colliding with drifting intergalactic gas clouds.

Some may argue that we should discount the past 4.6(ish) billion years, because after the Sun formed, less supernova material would have ended up in the solar system – though there’s a lot of evidence to suggest that supernova debris has landed on Earth in the past.

Even so, discounting those years still gives 1.81 billion supernovae. A human being weighing 70 kg contains about 7E27 (that’s 7,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000) atoms. Of those, there are about 4.5E22 Iron atoms. While unlikely, this does mean that it’s possible for at least one Iron atom from each of those supernovae to be in your body right now.

Even if only 0.0001% of those supernovae contributed any atoms to your body, that means that there are atoms from over 1000 supernovae in your blood right now.

Short answer: I genuinely have no idea how many atoms from supernovae any of us contains, but chances are it’s quite a few.



science-junkie:

Feeling Squishy
How squishy are your cells? UCLA’s Amy Rowat studies the texture or squishiness of cells. A cell’s texture can actually tell us important information about our health, and even begin to answer long-held questions about diseases like cancer.
The GIF above is a diagram of a microfluidic device (based on a drawing by Amy), which she uses to measure the cell’s softness or malleability.
From the video:The Squishiness of Cancer Cells→

science-junkie:

Feeling Squishy

How squishy are your cells? UCLA’s Amy Rowat studies the texture or squishiness of cells. A cell’s texture can actually tell us important information about our health, and even begin to answer long-held questions about diseases like cancer.

The GIF above is a diagram of a microfluidic device (based on a drawing by Amy), which she uses to measure the cell’s softness or malleability.

From the video:The Squishiness of Cancer Cells

Reblogged from molecularlifesciences ★ Originally from science-junkie


Reblogged from cassiesenpai ★ Originally from mythologiez


bobbycaputo:

‘Cities at Night’ as Captured by Astronauts Aboard the International Space Station

Since 2003 astronauts have been snapping up photographs of our beautiful planet from the International Space Station. All of these photographs have been archived together into a resource called The Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth. It’s through the utilization of this resource, as well as a database compiled by Spanish Astrophysicists that a little project called Cities at Night exists.

Cities at Night is a project that scours through the aforementioned archives, pulling out nighttime close-ups of cities from around the world, plotting them on a map. From New York to Beijing, a plethora of cities have been captured, showing the veins of streets and glow of lights sticking out like a firefly to the astronauts circumnavigating the Earth.

(Continue Reading)

Reblogged from thegingeredmess ★ Originally from bobbycaputo


cartoonpolitics:

"Corporations are people, my friend .. of course they are." .. (Mitt Romney)

cartoonpolitics:

"Corporations are people, my friend .. of course they are." .. (Mitt Romney)

Reblogged from no-tension-in-your-dance ★ Originally from cartoonpolitics


You will never be happy if you continue to search for what happiness consists of. You will never live if you are looking for the meaning of life.
— Albert Camus (via purplebuddhaproject)
Reblogged from purplebuddhaproject ★ Originally from purplebuddhaproject


fusrodrawblog:

About 95% done! Just need to add water, fish, and the flag on the small castle :)

fusrodrawblog:

About 95% done! Just need to add water, fish, and the flag on the small castle :)

Reblogged from happyplaceisfloatinginspace ★ Originally from fusrodrawblog


Reblogged from mad-girl-with-a-book ★ Originally from the-moon-and-the-night-spirit


tastefullyoffensive:

"Had to make this guide for my paper company on how to deliver my paper." [dicedece]

tastefullyoffensive:

"Had to make this guide for my paper company on how to deliver my paper."

[dicedece]

Reblogged from hawtistic ★ Originally from tastefullyoffensive


objectoccult:

Before the availability of the tape recorder and during the 1950s, when vinyl was scarce, people in the Soviet Union began making records of banned Western music on discarded x-rays. With the help of a special device, banned bootlegged jazz and rock ‘n’ roll records were “pressed” on thick radiographs salvaged from hospital waste bins and then cut into discs of 23-25 centimeters in diameter. “They would cut the X-ray into a crude circle with manicure scissors and use a cigarette to burn a hole,” says author Anya von Bremzen. “You’d have Elvis on the lungs, Duke Ellington on Aunt Masha’s brain scan — forbidden Western music captured on the interiors of Soviet citizens.”

objectoccult:

Before the availability of the tape recorder and during the 1950s, when vinyl was scarce, people in the Soviet Union began making records of banned Western music on discarded x-rays. With the help of a special device, banned bootlegged jazz and rock ‘n’ roll records were “pressed” on thick radiographs salvaged from hospital waste bins and then cut into discs of 23-25 centimeters in diameter. “They would cut the X-ray into a crude circle with manicure scissors and use a cigarette to burn a hole,” says author Anya von Bremzen. “You’d have Elvis on the lungs, Duke Ellington on Aunt Masha’s brain scan — forbidden Western music captured on the interiors of Soviet citizens.”

Reblogged from z7zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz7777z-deacti ★ Originally from objectoccult


comicbookcovers:

Excalibur #53, August 1992, cover by James Fry and Chris Ivy

comicbookcovers:

Excalibur #53, August 1992, cover by James Fry and Chris Ivy

Reblogged from fuckyeah-nerdery ★ Originally from comicbookcovers


iloveyoulikekanyeloveskanye:

homeworkmyass:

so much tension in one photo

its either 1am or 1pm in the pic and i dont know which is funnier

iloveyoulikekanyeloveskanye:

homeworkmyass:

so much tension in one photo

its either 1am or 1pm in the pic and i dont know which is funnier

Reblogged from organisedentropy ★ Originally from yoururlsucksandsodoyou


therothwoman:

I met the creator of this a month ago and he said he got a lot of hate mail from dudebros who thought that he was a woman complaining about these problems.

Reblogged from runeybadger ★ Originally from arrdeearr


mothernaturenetwork:

Fire up the coals and cook up some sweet, caramelized fruit anytime of the day with these recipes.

mothernaturenetwork:

Fire up the coals and cook up some sweet, caramelized fruit anytime of the day with these recipes.

Reblogged from mothernaturenetwork ★ Originally from mothernaturenetwork


Reblogged from thescientistsjournal ★ Originally from cockbl0calypse